French Bulldog English Bulldog Mix (Should You Get One?)

Petlity is reader-supported. When you buy via links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission at no cost to you. See our ethics statement.

The French Bulldog English Bulldog mix, also known as the Free-lance bulldog, is a crossbreed with a relatively short history, likely beginning in the 1990s.

This sturdy and friendly dog is a good companion dog for individuals with the means to cover its medical care. While it’s cute, this mixed breed has more health issues than most.

If you’re ready to learn everything you need to know about the Free-lance bulldog, you’ve come to the right place. Our ultimate guide will give you the basic information you need to know before bringing one of these lovable dogs home.

Breed Overview of a French Bulldog English Bulldog Mix

Breed NameFrench Bulldog English Bulldog Mix
Other NameFree-Lance, Freelance Bulldog, Free-Lance Bulldog, English Bantam Bulldogge
Lifespan10-12 years
Breed typeMixed breed
SizeSmall
Height14-15 inches
WeightUp to 50 pounds
ColorBlue, black, brindle, and fawn
CoatShort and smooth
TemperamentFriendly, Loving, and Loyal
Training DifficultyModerate
Energy levelMedium to high
Grooming needsModerate maintenance
Bark LevelMedium
Breed Overview: French Bulldog English Bulldog Mix

French Bulldog English Bulldog Mix Breed History

Free-lance bulldogs combine French bulldogs and English bulldogs to create a new mixed breed. The combination of these two breeds is relatively new, first appearing in the 1990s with other Frenchie mixed breeds.

However, both breeds have a history extending further back to the 1990s. The English bulldog was once bred to serve as a guard dog for farms in England. Its bulky body and short legs served it well in its service as a guard dog.

The French bulldog was first bred during the Industrial Revolution. People wanted smaller dogs to live as companions in their homes.

So breeders combined bulldogs with terriers to create a smaller breed. Since the breed was popularized in France, it was named the French bulldog.

Nicknames for the French Bulldog English Bulldog Mix

  • Free-Lance
  • Freelance Bulldog
  • Free-Lance Bulldog
  • English Bantam Bulldogge

French Bulldog English Bulldog Mix Appearance

French bulldog English bulldog mixes have flat faces and pronounced jowls, making them incredibly recognizable.

They are only 14 to 15 inches tall but weigh up to 50 pounds. They have thick and muscular builds and wide shoulders.

Like both parent breeds, they have short and glossy coats that come in many different colors. They are commonly white, cream, or fawn, although other colors are possible.

They may have large “bat ears” that stand tall on top of their large, square heads. However, they sometimes have the floppy ears, more characteristic of English bulldogs. They always have flattened faces since this is a trait shared by both parent breeds.

While the exact appearance of the mixed breed is uncertain, most Free-lance bulldogs are medium-sized dogs with bulky builds and short, smooth fur.

French Bulldog English Bulldog Mix Temperament and Personality

Both French bulldogs and English bulldogs are friendly, loving, and loyal. That means that most Free-lance bulldogs will share those traits. They are typically fun-loving and affectionate, despite their strong and bulky appearance.

Their social personalities and calm demeanors make them particularly good for families with other pets or children.

When they are trained and socialized as puppies, they’re unlikely to show aggression with members of their household.

However, both breeds have stubborn tendencies. This can make training tricky, although their desire to please usually overcomes their stubbornness.

Training Needs for French Bulldog English Bulldog Mix

It’s very important to train your Free-lance bulldog, since training and socialization allow them to cohabitate peacefully with both people and pets. These intelligent and people-pleasing dogs are relatively easy to train.

Even though they can be stubborn, not as much as Huskies, they respond well to positive reinforcement training.

When you use positive reinforcement and consistency from a young age, your Free-lance bulldog is more likely to be a well-adjusted adult dog.

They typically learn basic commands quickly. Their easy training and low prey drive make them great companions for households with children and other pets.

Although they aren’t as small as other Frenchie mixed breeds, they still make good companions for senior adults and homebound individuals.

Our dog training section has lots of tips and troubleshooting ideas for every step of your journey.

French Bulldog English Bulldog Mix Diet and Nutrition

Both French bulldogs and English bulldogs are prone to obesity, so it’s important to carefully monitor their diet. Their food portions should be calculated based on their age, weight, and health.

They can live long and happy lives when they have a diet filled with healthy fats, protein, calcium, and vitamins.

Since this mixed breed is smaller than regular Frenchies, it can be tempting to overfeed them to compensate for the difference in size.

Your dog’s veterinarian can help you determine appropriate portion sizes for your dog. You may need to reduce the amount of food they get if they start putting on weight.

Their diet should include at least 18% protein (from meat) and 5% healthy fat. Meat sources like beef, chicken, and fish can provide them with the nutrients they need. As puppies, they’ll need enough food to support their growing bodies.

Exercise Needs for the French Bulldog English Bulldog Mix

Free-lance bulldogs need low- to moderate-intensity workouts for about 30 minutes each day.

Since their flat faces make it difficult for them to breathe, they should be carefully monitored. Heat, exertion, and illness can make breathing harder for them.

During warm weather, they should be kept inside where they can cool down. Since they have low exercise needs, playing indoors is usually enough.

If you have a pool, it’s very important that you treat this mixed breed like you would a child.

They love water because it can help them cool off, but their muscular builds make it impossible for them to swim. When unsupervised, they can easily drown.

French Bulldog English Bulldog Mix Health Concerns & Lifespan

French bulldog English bulldog mixes are an extremely unhealthy breed. They combine the health problems of both breeds.

Since both breeds have the flat faces, they are almost guaranteed to have the breathing issues common in both breeds.

The following are common medical problems in Free-lance bulldogs:

  • Brachycephalic syndrome: this mixed breed almost always has these upper airway malformations that cause obstructed breathing. Illness, heat, and exertion can make it even harder for them to breathe.
  • Cancers: they can develop a number of cancers, including leukemia. While all dogs can get cancers, Free-lance bulldogs are particularly prone to the condition.
  • Eye problems: they often develop cataracts and progressive retinal atrophy.
  • Hearing loss: their chronic ear infections can cause premature deafness.
  • Heart disease: they are prone to heart disease, which is a leading cause of death in the breed. Proper diet and exercise can help minimize the risks.
  • Hip dysplasia: their hip joints can relax too much, causing the cartilage to wear way. This causes decreased mobility, muscular atrophy, and arthritis.
  • Patellar luxation: their kneecaps often slip out of place, causing discomfort and pain. In some cases, this can lead to mobility problems.
  • Skin problems: they have sensitive skin that’s prone to redness and irritation, usually caused by allergies.

Although they’re a mixed breed plagued by health concerns, they often live to be 10 to 12 years old.

While some conditions are unavoidable (like their breathing issues), proper care can help you minimize your dog’s risks of developing serious illness.

Grooming Needs for the French Bulldog English Bulldog Mix

Free-lance bulldogs have low-maintenance grooming needs. They have short, smooth coats that don’t need extensive brushing.

French Bulldog English Bulldog Mix shed fur all year round, but the amount of shedding tends to increase during seasonal weather changes.

You should brush them one or two times a week to remove loose hair and help redistribute natural oils across their coat.

My favorite shedding brush is the FURminator— it’s the best brush to get rid of all that loose hair and keep your home clean.

While they only need baths if they become extremely dirty, you should take special care to clean the folds of skin around their face and tail. Since dirt and bacteria get trapped in these folds, cleaning them carefully and regularly is important.

To clean the folds of skin, dampen a washcloth in warm water and gently wipe away debris. Once you’ve thoroughly cleaned out your Free-lance bulldog’s folds, use the low setting on a hair dryer to gently dry your dog.

Alternatively, you may use a clean towel to pat them dry. Since damp skin can lead to bacterial growth, you should always dry your bulldog after bathing.

You should also regularly clip their nails and brush their teeth. Your French bulldog English bulldog mix should have its teeth brushed at least once or twice a week. This can help prevent major dental problems, which can be incredibly painful for your dog.

Make sure to check your Free-lance bulldog’s ears and eyes for signs of infection. Since they’re prone to both ear and eye infections, watching for these signs can help you prevent complications down the road.

How Much Does a French Bulldog English Bulldog Mix Cost?

Whether it’s a French Bulldog English mix or a French Bulldog, the French Bulldog breed is expensive.

Like many dog breeds, the cost of Free-lance puppies can vary greatly. Most cost between $1000 and $4000, since bulldogs are notoriously difficult to breed. While they may occasionally show up at your local shelter, they’re not very common.

This mixed breed is pretty unhealthy due to its flat face. If you’re interested in getting a Free-lance bulldog puppy, look for a reputable breeder who takes steps to improve the health of their breeding lines.

Final Thoughts – English Bulldog French Bulldog Mix

French bulldog English bulldog mixes, often called Free-lance bulldogs, are medium-sized dogs with bulky bodies and oversized heads. They are fun-loving and affectionate dogs, much like both their parent breeds.

As cute as they are, they are fraught with health problems. Their flat faces cause significant breathing problems. Since both parent breeds have this issue, these issues are almost completely unavoidable.

Despite these problems, they make great companion pets and often do well with children and other dogs. With proper care, you can enjoy your Free-lance bulldog companion for years to come.

Photo of author
Lisemaine is a dog lover. She currently owns a Frenchie and enjoys working with and training her. She'll share her best tips with you to keep your dog happy, healthy, and active.


Leave a Comment