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11 Things to Know Before Getting a French Bulldog Puppy

Things to Know Before Getting a French Bulldog

Thinking about bringing a new French Bulldog puppy home? Wondering what you need to know before getting a French Bulldog puppy?

The French bulldog is one of the most popular dog breeds in the world. It is the top choice for most families who are looking for a friendly dog.

However, there are several things all new pet parents should know before bringing a French bulldog into their home.

The following are the 11 most important things you should know before getting a French Bulldog puppy. Let’s dive in.

1. French Bulldogs shouldn’t be left alone

sad french bulldog

Some dogs do well when left alone, but French bulldogs aren’t one of those breeds. They get severe separation anxiety, so they shouldn’t be left at home alone for more than a few minutes at a time.

While this makes them the perfect pet for homebodies and the elderly, it makes them a bad fit for people with busy lifestyles.

French bulldogs are super social and love to spend time with their humans. When you’re away, they can become extremely stressed.

That stress can lead to health problems or destructive behaviors. They may chew furniture or other belongings to cope with their anxiety, leaving your home a wreck.

2. Frenchies are prone to health problems

Like almost any dog breed, Frenchies have some health problems that occur frequently. Common health problems in French bulldogs include:

  • Breathing difficulties (occurs in all Frenchies due to their flat face shape)
  • Cleft palate (birth defect that causes respiratory issues)
  • Hemivertebrae (abnormally shaped spine)
  • Hip dysplasia (hip joint issue)
  • Megaesophagus (enlarged esophagus)
  • Atopic dermatitis (itchy skin)
  • Retinal dysplasia (eye disease)

While all dog breeds have some amount of health issues, French bulldogs are unhealthier than the average dog.

Their flattened faces make them prone to a number of health challenges, especially ones that impact their ability to breathe.

It’s important to consider the costs of healthcare before you buy an unhealthy breed like the French bulldog.

Whether you pay for insurance or cover their care out of pocket, it’s important to plan ahead for your dog’s medical expenses.

3. You should get your Frenchie spayed or neutered

Getting your Frenchie spayed (females) or neutered (males) is important for their health and behavior.

This surgical procedure can cut down the risk for different types of cancer and reduce the occurrence of urinary tract infections.

It can also help with behavior issues, especially in male dogs. Neutering can reduce their nippiness and aggression. When neutered, they’re less likely to be territorial, especially if there are other dogs around.

4. French Bulldogs are usually good with children

frenchie with kid

Some dog breeds don’t do well with children, but that isn’t the case with French Bulldogs. They are usually good-natured and make good companions for children (although there are some exceptions).

To make sure your French Bulldog gets along with kids, make sure they’re exposed to time with children as early as possible. Be sure to supervise your dog and your children until both are trained for positive interaction.

5. Frenchies usually get along well with other animals

french bulldog playing with another dog

In most cases, French Bulldogs get along well with other animals. While you should take steps to bond any pets, Frenchies typically get along well with other dogs and cats.

The more relaxed your other animals are, the better they’ll get along with your newest addition.

6. French Bulldogs don’t require much exercise

One of the reasons people love Frenchies is because they’re relatively low maintenance, at least when it comes to exercise.

They’re good companions for people who live in small apartments or houses, even if their human companions can’t get out for walks often.

While they’re content to curl up on the couch with you, most of their exercise needs can be met during play indoors.

They enjoy running around and playing. Since they’re so small, they can do that comfortably from your living room.

Although they don’t need much exercise, it’s important to make sure they’re still active throughout the day.

Exercise is important for their long-term health. Even if you aren’t taking your Frenchie for a walk, you should be playing with them regularly.

7. French Bulldogs cannot regulate their temperature

Since Frenchies have such short noses, they often have trouble breathing. This trouble contributes to issues regulating temperature.

In hot weather, they may struggle to keep themselves cool. This can lead to serious complications and even death.

Even if your Frenchie seems like they’re having fun running around outside, it’s important to be extra cautious during warm weather. Increased body temperature from heat and exertion can be very dangerous for these little dogs.

That means that you should only get a Frenchie if you live in a cooler climate or have access to air conditioning.

When they get hot, they’ll need to be able to lay down somewhere cool until their body temperature can return to normal.

8. They should have formal dog training (Professional dog trainer)

french bulldog running

Frenchies do best when they’ve been properly trained as puppies. Although they’re bright and relatively easy to train, training by a professional can help them get the head start they need as well-behaved and friendly companions.

The formal training process helps them to learn basic commands. When your dog understands these commands, it will be easier for you to redirect negative and disruptive behaviors.

9. French Bullgods live a long time (between 8 and 14 years)

They have a pretty good lifespan, despite the health problems common to the breed.

Most sources suggest that they live between 11 and 14 years, although they may live anywhere from 8 to 14 years. Buying a French Bulldog is a decade-long commitment, so it should not be done lightly.

10. Frenchies cannot swim

French bulldogs can’t swim. That means it is very important to always supervise your Frenchie when you’re around water.

Although you can put a life jacket on your dog to mitigate the risks, life jackets don’t work well enough to rely on them alone.

When you’re around water, you should treat your Frenchie the same way you’d treat a baby. It only takes one slip to have fatal consequences.

Since Frenchies struggle to regulate their temperature, they may even seek out water without realizing the risk it holds.

11. French bulldogs are expensive

French bulldogs can be prohibitively expensive. Although you may find them available for adoption at your local shelter, buying them from breeders can be extremely expensive.

This is largely because they cannot conceive without medical intervention, something that costs a lot of money.

Most Frenchies cost between $1,500 and $5,000. However, some buyers report paying over $10,000 for their French bulldog puppies.

Buying from a reputable dog breeder will cost you more, but reputable breeders often do their best to reduce the occurrence of certain health problems. This creates a healthier breed over time.

Rare colors can easily cost more than $10,000. An extremely rare blue Frenchie with orange eyes sold for a staggering $100,000.

This dog, Micro Machine, is the most expensive French bulldog ever sold. While the one you choose will be less expensive, their price tag can be a major limiting factor for most pet owners.

Final Thoughts

Now that you have all the information you need, it should be easier to decide if a French Bulldog is the right breed for you and your family.

If there’s one thing that we need you to take from this article is that there are some well-rooted concerns about their health. But this shouldn’t be a deal-breaker as long you know how to take of your dog.

If you have any feedback or questions, then please don’t hesitate to leave a comment below.

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